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Economic and Social Council Day 1


The delegates for the Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) began their first negotiations today over the implementation of a global economic system and the promotion of sustainable development within it. The session was off to a slow start, beginning with an opening statement from each country. During this first round, all countries emphasized their dedication both to furthering domestic development under the framework of the Sustainable Development Goals, and to create a better global economic system to ensure a sustainable future for all. Overall, there was a consensus that cooperation between Member States is essential to achieve the SDGs in time for 2030. Furthermore, the delegations underlined the fact that sustainable development is not only an economic matter, but also requires looking at social and environmental factors.


Perhaps most notably, Bolivia raised a motion to discuss what each country considers their priority in terms of development. There was some disagreement there, with a divide between countries from the Global South and North. The former essentially argued that a one-size developmental model does not fit all, and that the SDGs cannot be achieved by developing countries without substantial financial subsidy and guidance from developed countries.


Meanwhile, delegations from the Global North recognised the differences in status between countries and the implications for development outcomes, but emphasized the fact that responsibilities should not simply be shifted away from developing countries onto the shoulders of developed countries.


In regards to the motion, countries such as Colombia and Bolivia stressed the importance of stabilizing economies and financing physical infrastructure. Nigeria, and Japan rather wished to prioritise sustainable finance. Yet other countries such as Côte d’Ivoire and Indonesia saw subsidizing technological infrastructure as the most pressing measure to be taken in order to achieve the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals.


- Micheal Littoris of the New York Times

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